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Climate Features

Houston/Galveston region faces $12 billion infrastructure losses from climate change
 Guidry News Service

Austin, TX – Galveston-area sea level rise over the next 100 years due to climate change could displace more than 100,000 households and create more than $12 billion in infrastructure losses, according to a report released today commissioned by Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and British Consulate-General Houston, The Socio-Economic Impact of Sea Level Rise in the Galveston Bay Region.  [more]

The Impact of Global Warming on Texas
 Edited by Jurgen Schmandt, Judith Clarkson and Gerald R. North

The Texas Climate Initiative is pleased to provide an online preview of this comprehensive and readable account of what is currently known about the threats and opportunities posed by climate change in Texas. This book connects global climate change to the expected changes in the local climates and places where we Texans live, work and play. The book will be published by the University of Texas Press.  [more]

Texas’ Changing Economic Climate: Risks and Opportunities in a Carbon Constrained World 

RA conference was held on January 29, 2009 at the Texas State Capitol Extension, Austin, Texas.  For details visit: www.liveoakinitiative.com/TCEC09

Will West Texas Become a Climate Change Hotspot in the United States?

Regional modeling of how long-term global warming patterns might emerge in the US suggests that future climates in West Texas could be very different than those of the past. Climate researchers used unique state-of-the-art high resolution nested climate simulation models to explore the importance of fine scale processes in determining climate change hotspots in the continental United States and Mexico.[more] 


Climate Features

Houston/Galveston region faces $12 billion infrastructure losses from climate change
 Guidry News Service

Austin, TX – Galveston-area sea level rise over the next 100 years due to climate change could displace more than 100,000 households and create more than $12 billion in infrastructure losses, according to a report released today commissioned by Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and British Consulate-General Houston, The Socio-Economic Impact of Sea Level Rise in the Galveston Bay Region.  [more]

The Impact of Global Warming on Texas 

The Texas Climate Initiative is pleased to provide an online preview of this comprehensive and readable account of what is currently known about the threats and opportunities posed by climate change in Texas. This book connects global climate change to the expected changes in the local climates and places where we Texans live, work and play. The book will be published by the University of Texas Press. [more]

Texas’ Changing Economic Climate: Risks and Opportunities in a Carbon Constrained World 

RA conference to be held on January 29, 2009 at the Texas State Capitol Extension, Austin, Texas.  For details visit: www.liveoakinitiative.com/TCEC09

Will West Texas Become a Climate Change Hotspot in the United States?

Regional modeling of how long-term global warming patterns might emerge in the US suggests that future climates in West Texas could be very different than those of the past. Climate researchers used unique state-of-the art high resolution nested climate simulation models to explore the importance of fine scale processes in determining climate change hotspots in the continental United States and Mexico. [more]

Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics and Climate Feedbacks

This review article looks at some of the limitations of the traditional method for modelling carbon-cycle climate feedbacks. Carbon-cycle feedbacks are usually dealt with as largely independent above ground (photosynthesis) and below ground (respiration) effects stimulated by a gradual increase in CO2 and temperature.The authors argue that this approach over-simplifies a complex system and consequently neglects dynamic non-linear interactions between physical, chemical and biological processes in the ecosystem. [more]

 

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The Texas Climate Initiative is a project of the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) and is directed by Robert Harriss.
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